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Well Wisconsin Radio

Well Wisconsin Radio

Hosted by Senior Program Manager, Renee Fox

A podcast discussing topics of health and well-being from experts from all around the State of Wisconsin. New in 2022, you’ll be able to tune into Well Wisconsin Radio whenever you want and wherever you are! Subscribe to Well Wisconsin Radio in the podcast platform of your choice to be notified when each new episode is released. Let’s tackle 2022 together through learning and seeking opportunities to be in the moment.

Transcript

Morgan Meinen
Hello and welcome to Well Wisconsin Radio, a podcast discussing health and well-being topics with experts from all around the state of Wisconsin my name is Morgan Meinen
My guest today is Dr. Matthew Reetz, Matthew is the Executive Director of the Madison Audubon,

The Madison Audubon is a proud community of passionate individuals actively working to improve Wisconsin’s environment.
From youth and community education to habitat restoration, through the work of our staff, members, and volunteers, they are making a difference for Wisconsin’s birds and beyond!

Morgan Meinen
So Matt welcome to well Wisconsin Radio I’m so excited to talk to you today and grateful to the person who recommended you to be on the show so we can talk about birds.

00:07.99
Matt Reetz
Um, thank you Morgan! It’s fabulous to be here.

00:11.22
Morgan Meinen
So the first thing I wanted to start out with was just talking about the audubon. Obviously we’re here to talk about the Madison Audubon so I wondered if you could just tell us more about it in the work that you do.

00:20.86
Matt Reetz
Of course Madison Audubon started as a sort of more traditional birdwatching club in the 30 s and since then we’ve evolved quite a lot to be a respected impactful conservation organization and we. Made up of a community of people that advocate on on important environmental issues that lead in habitat protection and conservation and also environmental education and we are a chapter of the national audubon. But. Most folks are surprised to learn that we’re actually separate organizations so all of our outreach and fundraising and programming are entirely separate and we serve not just Madison we’re in 10 counties in Southern Wisconsin and really because of the nature of our work in protecting birds. We are really operating throughout the state of Wisconsin. And and the midwest and even beyond.

01:19.90
Morgan Meinen
And are there any missions or projects that the audubon is focused on right now.

01:24.29
Matt Reetz
Well Morgan. We are never not busy with something um, our official mission is to protect and improve habitat for birds and other wildlife through land acquisition and management education and advocacy and so we work really hard. Have effective programs that align with these three branches of our mission. So for example in our advocacy and conservation work. We’re currently working on a number of really wonderful citizen science programs like monitoring Bald Eagle nests throughout Southern Wisconsin and american kestrel nest boxes which is one of the largest programs in the in the country we collect data on bird window strikes as well. Also advocating broadly on issues like conservation funding and the migratory bird treaty act as well and then in our land protection branch of our mission. We. Own two major wildlife sanctuaries. It’s nearly two thousand acres of land that have been wonderfully restored to beautiful native prairies and savannahs and wetlands and much much more. And these provide really incredible crucial habitats for birds and other wildlife and lots of opportunities I should mention too for recreation for everyone who who can visit those are goose pond sanctuary in Columbia County and fable grove sanctuary in Jefferson County North of Lake Mills and then finally in our education branch of our mission. We do all sorts of work to create and deliver curricula and programs and lessons and resources for anyone interested in learning more about birds and wildlife and nature and these involve our regular. Things like evenings with audubon speaker series adult education classes field trips and a rigorous youth education program.

03:14.54
Morgan Meinen
Yeah, you’re right? You guys certainly are busy. Lots of fun things going on and I love that call out for recreation because the weather’s been really nice this week So I myself am looking forward to getting out now and checking out some of those places that you mentioned.

03:18.47
Matt Reetz
And all that’s fine.

03:29.26
Morgan Meinen
Matt what are some things that you wish people knew or considered about birds.

03:32.00
Matt Reetz
Oh good question Morgan. There’s a lot of course birds are fascinating but you know I think just generally speaking I would tell your listeners that birds matter they’re really really important. They give us so much but there are so many things that threaten them I mean to give you an example since the 1970 s we have lost two point nine billion breeding adult birds from the United States and Canada and that’s across every ecosystem and includes familiar birds too. So grassland birds like metal larks. They’ve suffered a loss of more than half of their numbers like more than 720000000 birds and that’s due to a whole bunch of different factors like habitat loss and windows strikes and introduced predators and more and now there’s climate change that’s being thrown into the mix that is predicted to threaten two-th thirds of North America’s bird species. So there’s a lot of threats to birds but birds like like I said they matter they provide essential extremely valuable ecosystem services. They’re doing insect pest control all the time they’re pollinating they do seed dispersal they cycle nutrients all of that stuff benefits everybody. And these services are worth trillion. Excuse me trillions of dollars annually and birds are providing them for free and if we lost those services we couldn’t replace them with any kind of technology um more directly birdwatching is a ah hundred and $7000000000 industry in the United States and that’s through you know, tourism and jobs I mean quit and sales like binoculars and feeders. So that’s a direct benefit to our economy and that’s like especially true in a place like Wisconsin that enjoys such incredible natural spaces and bird diversity and you know we sometimes will hear from politicians and leaders that. We can’t afford to protect the environment because doing so damages our economy but that’s just simply not the case. So the cost of losing birds and which which is happening now is really from a cost that’s too high to bear.

05:39.53
Morgan Meinen
And yeah, and another reason why I’m really glad to be talking to you and getting this information out there I feel like this is a perfect time to be kind of acknowledging our title which I’m giving you all the credit for Matt Matt thought about our title birds are better than tick dog. And I want to dive into that because obviously that was something that caught my attention and as you and I have been working together to build out this episode and so I’d love if you could kind of explain that more and just tell us more about why you think birds are better than Tiktok.

06:07.28
Matt Reetz
Ah, well birds are pretty fascinating and and catchy on their own. But I thought you know given the state of technology that I throw out a title that might catch some some ah social media users out there and and for those who don’t know what Tiktok is it’s ah it’s an incredibly popular social media app. People can record and and share short videos for others to enjoy. Ah you know sometimes folks will stare at their screen for hours looking at these tictacs. Um, so you know ultimately birds are free to enjoy just like Tiktok is. And you can enjoy both of those things anytime anywhere you will hi in the world. Both of them provide hours of entertainment for whatever. However, you define entertainment but unlike Tiktok birds aren’t. Limiting your social connections by staring at a screen. In fact, they bring people together. There’s so many people who enjoy getting outside and enjoying birds together I would say that unlike staring at your phone which can cause issues with you know, like sleep and emotional well-being ah birds actually bring excellent. Mental and physical health benefits happy to talk more about that and ah you know birds aren’t tapping into your email accounts and like which Tiktok is probably doing. They got into a lot of trouble like that. They’re not birds. Don’t drain your phone battery either. So you can go outside and watch birds. You can turn your phone off and preserve your battery. Just get outside and and enjoy all those free ecosystem services I talked about and ah and I know finally okay Tiktok is a really great tech app. It’s incredible technology but it has nothing on being able to fly and birds can fly. So I mean the only natural conclusion is that. Taken together. Birds are much better than tip tak right.

07:50.40
Morgan Meinen
Oh you put together a lot of really compelling reasons and I’m just acknowledging that I myself am not a tiktokck user I do not have social media so I cannot kind of be devil’s advocate here and speak for Tiktok. But I think you’ve again, you’ve provided a lot of really good reasons and. I am inclined to to side with you and say that I think I think you’ve made a good argument here for getting outside and enjoying birds. Especially you know, making that connection to well-being I also know that the audubon is known for birds. But.

08:10.66
Matt Reetz
Excellent, right.

08:23.84
Morgan Meinen
Like you’ve mentioned already you guys play a key role in conservation which we know is so important to Wisconsin especially can you tell me more about that.

08:29.87
Matt Reetz
Absolutely okay, so I mean it’s so clear that birds then one of the things I like to say a lot is birds are awesome and I feel like that’s sort of a universal truth I’m a little bit biased but anyone you meet at least has positive feelings about birds I mean everybody’s got a bird story. And many folks are just really downright obsessed with birds and that’s for good reason. Um, and I feel because Madison Audubon is fortunate to work on the celebration and protection of Wisconsin’s birds we were we’re sort of in the joy business and we’re out. But. But protecting birds is serious business too. So birds are a really wonderful way to do more broad scale conservation because they are so intricate intricately tied into how pretty much everything functions so we view birds as ambassadors for the entire natural world. And by protecting and celebrating birds that means great things for our communities and environment. So we’re a bit of a unique audubon. So yeah, we we do all the traditional things that audubons. Do we do field trips and programs and talks and such but we have invested. A lot in different approaches to effective broad scale conservation. So let me just give you a couple of examples. The first is our education program. That’s it’s unique. It’s welcoming and we hope it’s effective education programming for people of all ages. So. But in particular are youth education programs really attempting to break the mold of sort of traditional environmental education in a couple of important ways. So rather than doing single programs where we visit a school or have a school visit and and ah. Have a group of kids and we talk about maybe well how cool birds are what a bird is we visit kids at their schools and community centers where they are already doing most of their learning and you know of course we do this safely in person when possible mostly outside and we do virtual when necessary. But this really allows us to spend a whole bunch of quality time with each kid and we also visit with the same kids weekly so we can build on the prior activities cultivate trust generate curiosity lots of good benefits and that curriculum is also comprehensive. It’s not just about birds. It’s It’s about so so much more it empowers kids to investigate think scientifically ask questions and and then the end too our most of our programs reach historically excluded communities too. Who don’t generally have access to this kind of programming. So.

11:12.97
Matt Reetz
Really want to have a broader impact for conservation through our education work on birds and I guess the second thing is that that’s really unique about Madison Audubon is that we’re also what’s known as a land trust and that is basically a nonprofit organization that’s directly involved in protecting land for. Some value and in our case, it’s conservation value so we have protected thousands of acres of critical habitat in Southern Wisconsin and very proud of that and of the 450 plus audubon chapters that there are nationwide we are among the top. And the amount of acreage we own and manage and that’s all for really high quality native habitats that again provide really great recreational opportunities too and we’re also only one of a handful aud of on chapters. That’s a nationally accredited land trust which means that we’ve earned. A distinction by demonstrating really professional practices. Ethical business practices, responsible governance and good sign. Good sound financial management and all of this is so that we can meet a very lofty goal of protecting those special. Natural places we own the goose pond sanctuary fable growth sanctuary and protect them forever.

12:32.40
Morgan Meinen
That’s amazing and I feel like that’s a perfect segue into I wanted to get in now to kind of that mental health and well-being aspect of this episode and you know talking about conservation talking about these recreational areas places you can go the wonderful programs that you’re doing with youth. I Just wondered if you could help kind of dissect that more on how you feel like birds in the work of the audubon can positively impact our mental and and just general well-being.

12:54.76
Matt Reetz
Oh that’s a great question it first. It’s clear that birds bring people joy I mean just for me personally I get completely recharged just by taking when I’m walking the dogs I take time to look around my neighborhood and watch what they’re credible behaviors they’re doing. All the beautiful colors they’re displaying and of course listening to them call and so and sing and so many people look to nature and birds for joy or fun or restoration or what have you and really nothing illustrated this more than how much people turn to nature for relief. And recharge and distraction during the pandemic during you know all the various worries and and hard times nature and birds provided so much needed thus a solace or diversion and there were times when you couldn’t at that. Really the earlier. Ah height of pandemic you couldn’t buy feeders and binoculars anymore they were gone. Um, we also heard from people living in ah in senior care facilities too where folks were even more cooped up than the rest of us that birds were really important. To seniors and their families too. So we know that birds were really a ah source of joy for folks. But that’s just kind of anecdotal stuff. There are ah there are lots of research data to support the importance of nature in birds for mental health and well-being so I’m going to ah take kids for example to start here many of your listeners. Probably had the same kind of childhood I I did which is I got kind of kicked out of the house during the summer mornings and and the weekends and and then I was off on my own and I got whistled home for for lunch and dinner and ah the rest of the time I was out. Flooring and like flipping rocks and collecting bugs and probably driving my mom crazy because I was ruining my my my pants. Um, but I want to use a phrase kids these days I can’t believe I’m going to use this phrase but ah kids these days. Spending the data show that the the kids are spending as little as 30 minutes outside per day and up to 7 hours in front of a screen per day and that’s terrible. Um, that is ah that’s something we’re trying to reverse and the the research studies by organizations like.

15:11.96
Morgan Meinen
You know.

15:22.93
Matt Reetz
Cdc and American Academy Of Pediatrics and others show that kids engage in an outdoor education. They get outside. They’re getting so many amazing benefits physical emotional cognitive academic they’re for example, children who engage in nature learning and exploration. They enjoy better academic performance improved concentration reduce discipline problems, better creativity and problem solving better cooperation. They have more confidence they have reduced stress levels. Um and they also I think one study show that they had a better immune and cardiovascular health. So that’s just one of the reasons why our education programs focuses. So heavily on getting kids outside to explore because it’s getting so many more benefits. Um, and of course that’s just the kids. There’s ah, there’s a lot of kids at heart out there too. So there’s data research evidence that supports the conclusion that. Being outside in nature benefits our mood our physiological wellbeing cognitive functioning functioning and there are now many medical professionals who are prescribing use of green space to their patients which is fabulous. It’s a ah. There are a number of programs in a bunch of different states where they’re doing prescription park prescription style programs. So telling people to get outside in the green space. So and that’s nature oriented but there’s also data for birds too. Directly that show that bird watching can have a positive effect on mental health and happiness. So there’s the there is a great study out of the Uk discovered that people who are able to watch birds from their homes have a lower risk of depression stress and anxiety. Ah, compared to people who live in less nature less nature dense areas with fewer birds. So fascinating stuff. Ah yeah, and there’s even ah, a really great example of folks who a small study where they they ask people.

17:15.11
Morgan Meinen
Um, yeah, it’s all really compelling.

17:28.45
Matt Reetz
And they found that Birdsong was the type of natural sound that they most often associated with stress recovery. So that remind the birdson reminded them of relaxing natural landscapes so it was a pleasant thing to listen to just by itself. But it also had these sort of beyond benefits.

17:45.25
Morgan Meinen
Well I can say just personally for myself. You know again as the weather has turned and you and I have been talking about this a little bit I very much enjoy sitting outside and listening to the birds and filling my bird feeders and. I was asking you a couple personal questions about Matt. What do I do you know they keep trying to build their nest in my patio heater and I don’t want them to and and so I totally agree I mean and again just ah, a great time of year for us to be giving folks this information and talking about this because I think we’re all so excited to. You know finally have a little bit of nicer weather and to be getting outside again and it is the perfect connection to you know mental health and well-being especially with those studies that you just laid out I wanted to dive a little bit more into. Um you know you mentioned like how nice it is to be looking around and seeing the different types of birds around you.

18:32.17
Matt Reetz
Me.

18:35.70
Morgan Meinen
And I wondered how birds in our backyard might give us insight to the state of the ecosystem around us.

18:39.88
Matt Reetz
Oh well that’s okay so the folks are probably aware of the old phrase. The canary like a canary in a coal mine which ah, that’s of course stemmed from think it was british coal miners they would lower caged canaries into mine shafts and to. The birds would basically tell them that whether or not there were harmful or deadly conditions in the in the shaft. So the iron the irony of that phrase is that birds are both sort of that literal and figurative canary in a coal mine so they can both indicate current problems but they can foretell. Kind of major threats to our environment and even our own existence. So a good example of this that comes to mind is that the rise of Ddt in the middle of the last part of the century. So this is a. Everybody remembers Ddt as a chemical that was used widely to control insect populations and it was at the time Ddt was really the most powerful pesticide the world had ever seen. It was it was capable of killing hundreds of different kinds of insects at a time and of different. So ah, the hundreds of insects and different kinds of insects too. It was very effective was used to control malaria and typhus to to great effect. It was developed in the thirty s I think and thought to have no human related side effects. Its inventor was awarded the nobel prize for chemistry. Um, in the 1940 s and 50 s my mom tells me that there was recalls that there used to be a ddt truck that count would come through her neighborhood and it would know they had various names for it like ah I think it’s like smoky Joe. The fogger truck who. The local kids including my mom would run behind the truck playing in the chemical mist and so was but it wasn’t long until again, they didn’t think there was gonna have any effect on anything but it wasn’t long until folks started reporting common birds backyard birds like robins american robins other common backard birds lying in the grass that had died after exposure to ddt direct exposure and it wasn’t much longer than that when populations of Bald Eagle and other raptor species like falcons. They completely plummeted because of. Then they found out it was because Ddt had built up on their tissues and limited their ability to produce eggs. So our bald eagle populations almost went extinct because they couldn’t produce anything so Rachel Carson fast forward Rachel Carson writing the famous silent spring her book which brought a total new public awareness.

21:22.24
Matt Reetz
Through birds that nature was vulnerable to that sort of unchecked human intervention. So and through lots of advocacy and and you know lots of different people being involved Ddt was eventually banned and and of course there’s now even still new medical studies that documents that some long-term. Potential effects of dvt in a human health too and birds were the but were the indicator for that they were what was telling us there was something wrong. So there are lots of other types of environmental issues. There’s you know oil spills chemicals climate change etc habitat loss avian flu what what have you. Um, ultimately sort of the fate of birds is really tied to our own and ah, you know I guess I would wrap that this answer up by saying that there’s a famed ecologist. His name is Thomas Lovejoy Dr Thomas Lovejoy I. Love this quote if you take care of birds you take care of most of the environmental problems in the world. Ah, love that quote and really if we’re taking care of birds we’re taking care of all of us. So their fate is really tied to our fate.

22:20.20
Morgan Meinen
Yeah.

22:25.72
Morgan Meinen
So how can people be protecting bird habitats at home. What are things that they can be looking for.

22:32.57
Matt Reetz
Oh well, another fabulous question There’s so much power in what individuals can do for birds overall by by at home. There’s a bunch of different things. You can do well I’ll give you just a few I mean just think about how much of the landscape is made up. Of our private lands private property homes lawns gardens. There’s it’s itself. It’s a lot and so there’s a couple of there’s a few really easy things to do that will help birds. Um, for one you can make your the windows on your house safer. So up my own home. The director of the audubon society I’m sad to admit had that had a sliding glass door that kept having birds collide with it at least 1 to 2 per year while it was over one year because I I fixed the problem quickly. But up to a billion birds die per year just in the us from collisions with with windows. So I mean the windows can confuse birds a number of different ways they reflect habitat and you know birds think they could pass through because they just don’t see it. Um.

23:32.43
Morgan Meinen
So wow.

23:46.60
Matt Reetz
But there’s a lot that you can do to make your windows safe by making them more visible to birds. So ah, you know there’s a number of different things you can do you can that can involve screening. You can put patterns on the glass. There are lots of products for that. But you can also do some Diy products too. Um I put up a grid of dots. These little white dots on my slaming glass door I I never see them and I also have not seen a single dead bird out there either since I put those up sos I was really glad for that and I should point out that the american bird conservancy is a great but ah nonprofit organization that operates nationally and beyond. Has great resources for for that sort of window thing. Um.

24:26.15
Morgan Meinen
Okay, and we can be linking that up in show notes too I’m curious where would somebody be buying product like that is that something that you get from like a home improvement store or where would you be looking for these materials.

24:38.38
Matt Reetz
You can you can go to the websites of different ah companies that produce them. Um, there are a number of different types. But there are also ones that you can build on your own. In fact, we we had a recent class at Madison Audubon where we helped people build their own bird friendly.

24:43.90
Morgan Meinen
Okay.

24:58.32
Matt Reetz
Um I don’t remember the exact design but there’s a way that there’s these strips that you can and strings you can stick outside your home that dangle down and they alert the the birth to an issue out there. So um, yeah, and the other really really.

25:09.88
Morgan Meinen
Okay.

25:16.26
Matt Reetz
Great thing you can do at home is to provide some kind of native Habitat at home. So you can. You can certainly? You should add feeders and nest boxes and bird baths and all that kind of stuff the birds love that stuff and make sure you clean your feeders regularly. But planting native species provides food and habitat and shelter that they don’t don’t normally get from a traditional home landscape. That’s you know, sort of the the non-native Showy plants that you might get at a big box store or or lawn.

25:48.59
Morgan Meinen
Looking it.

25:52.12
Matt Reetz
And so when you plant natives you’re benefiting wildlife and you’ll get all sorts of great birds who are coming to feed or rest might get butterflies too and all sorts of native species. But you also get some of the prettiest and heartiest species. You can buy because they’re adapted to Wisconsin’s climate so they’re you don’t have to you can hardly have to water these things you hardly have to maintain them so they they also save you water money and time because they’re adapted to be low maintenance. So and this doesn’t have to be your entire yard. You can you can spread these through as wherever you. You got a good spot. There’s lots of resources online for that to find good native species that are that benefit different kinds of birds. The national audubon has a great resource for finding native species for your area.

26:40.80
Morgan Meinen
Great Recommendations. So Summer is just around the corner. Kids will be out of school. Ah very soon. Parents will be kind of searching for activities for their kiddos to do you’ve already kind of mentioned some of the programs and referenced some classes that you have. So just wondered if you could kind of help summarize like does the audubon have any programs that you’d like to highlight for people to be looking at in the coming months.

27:02.90
Matt Reetz
Um, we’re always again Morgan we’re always up to something good I hope so anyway we have field trips all year long we’d be so glad for for folks to join in those are those are listed on our website as our other events that are family friendly. We have a. Ah, birding and biking event in a couple of weeks here in Madison. Um, so there’s there are there are always things going on that our event page will will give you an idea of that and the other thing I want to mention too is that I know that that a lot of folks. Maybe don’t live in the area or are. Aren’t able to join in person but there are lots of really great activities and nature lessons for kids and those are all available for free on our website. So and also on our Youtube page and our Facebook pages they’re designed to be. Easy and fun and informative and really designed to get families and kids exploring outside. So definitely check those out. Love it if you use them and and enjoy them.

28:02.33
Morgan Meinen
And yeah I love that and where can listeners find more information about the audubon and the programs available Could you maybe share the website or places that you’d like to direct them to learn more.

28:13.27
Matt Reetz
El but je absolutely well First of all our website is Madison Audubon Dot O R G it’s chock full of info. Hopefully it’s user, friendly and navigating I’ll I’ll certainly share morgan more links to direct links for for some pages to I would you know.

28:29.65
Morgan Meinen
Um, yeah, that would be great.

28:32.94
Matt Reetz
Certainly if you want to become a member of Madison Audubon wherever you may live whether it’s in our service area or somewhere else in Wisconsin or or anywhere else we you? We definitely invite you to join you receive our quarterly newsletter which also provides more information on the things that we do in the events that we we have. Also well you can sign up for our email list with without even joining too. You can do that on our website as well. So would just to that love to have everybody participate as that in whatever way, they feel comfortable and everybody’s welcome.

29:03.37
Morgan Meinen
That’s great and like Matt mentioned we’ll get some links out there for you guys in the show notes so you can be kind of exploring their website and learning more Matt as we wrap up I just wondered if there was anything else that you wanted to share with our listeners as part of today’s episode

29:14.10
Matt Reetz
Well first of all, don’t forget this mantra birds are awesome. Okay, birds are awesome. The universal truth but I also wanted to hear with something a little bit more serious which has been going around and in the news and that is. The highly highly pathogenic avian influenza the h p a I bird flu that’s been in the news of late that has been detected in. It’s ah it’s typically of affects domestic farms of poultry. But it has been detected in wild species, raptors and water files in Wisconsin too. So there I will share a link to our website that provides much more information on this and where you can get the latest on where the detections are found at what species they’re affecting. So a lot of folks are asking us about well what about my bird feeders. Okay, great question and first and I also should mention this is different than there was there was a mystery illness that was that came around last year that was ah that was primarily infecting songbirds and we made recommendations to folks to take down their feeders. This is different. We haven’t seen that mystery illness this year. This is a different disease and we have carefully examined all the available data on ah avian flu the current outbreak and we’re not recommended removal of Song Beaters Song Feeders song bird feeders and baths except under certain conditions. And that is when you your feeders are visited by birds like Waterfowl or if you get a lot of raptors that are that would be highly susceptible to the avian flu. So some folks set up a feeder and then there’s ah, there’s ducks that come and visit their feeder. If. That’s the case then you should shut down your feeder if you’re not getting that kind of if you’re just getting songbirds then then you’re okay, the other thing is if you keep domestic poultry or you live in close proximity to a poultry farm. It’s probably a good idea to take your feeders down. If you leave your feeders up. We. Always recommend that anyone with bird feeders continues to follow responsible protocol. You gotta clean your feeders and baths probably once per week. Um, we always recommend a 10 % bleach solution 1 part bleach mixed with 9 parts water rinse it thoroughly allow it to dry completely before you refill it. So keep that helps keep keeps the birds safe from this and anything else that could potentially affect songbird songbids at your feeder. So again I’ll send information. Ah, ah to your listeners about but where the data that we used to to form these recommendations and and.

31:57.78
Morgan Meinen
Perfect. Yeah, thank you for mentioning that I’ve read about that as well. So I’m sure it’s on the minds of others. So really important information that you shared not only about that but just all throughout this episode Matt I want to thank you again for joining me today. This has been.

31:58.12
Matt Reetz
How to keep birds safe.

32:12.80
Morgan Meinen
Such a fun conversation and I’ve learned a lot and I hope it’s been helpful for our listeners.

32:14.87
Matt Reetz
Well I hope so too and I had a great time. Thank you again. Morgan for the invitation.

32:19.21
Morgan Meinen
My pleasure.
00:00.00
Morgan Meinen
Thanks so much for listening in today I hope you enjoyed the show for those of you listening as part of the well Wisconsin program the code for this episode is you guessed it. It’s birds. If you’re looking for a transcript of our conversation today if you’d like to take the survey and let me know if you have recommendations for guests for well Wisconsin Radio or if you want to check out the previous episodes we’ve done you can visit http://webmdhealthservices.com/wellwisconsinradio you can also subscribe on the podcast platform of your choice so you never miss an episode until next time take care.

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